Hampstead American Legion Family

Hampstead American Legion Family

The American Legion was chartered by Congress in 1919 as a patriotic veterans organization. Focusing on service to veterans, service members and communities, the Legion evolved from a group of war-weary veterans of World War I into one of the most influential nonprofit groups in the United States.
It wasn’t until 1945 that the Hampstead American Legion Post 200 was formed. There had been many attempts prior to that, but they had all disbanded. Their very first meetings was in the upstairs of the, then Hampstead Fire Hall, now Towne Pride Interiors on Main Street. In January of 1950 they purchased their own Post Home on the corner of Main Street and Lower Beckleysville Road where they established a teen center, held carnivals to the rear and made it their home.
In March of 1969, ten acres was purchased on the outskirts of town with an old barn said to be built around 1860 and after renovations became the home it is today. Since then additions have been made to the building and grounds.
In 1950, with a wish to “help the boys”, the American Legion Auxiliary Unit 200 was formed followed by the Sons of the American Legion Squadron 200 in 1977. The last member of our family to join us was the American Legion Riders who arrived in 2008.
Because we are a club, you must be a member to enter. Members may sign in guests with them. However there is a hall and a pavilion that is rented for events by the public. Most of our events are open to the public also. We have a beautiful quilt block on our old barn and have been chosen to be #36 on the Carroll County Barn Quilt Trail.
As you look in and around Post 200, respect and honor of our veterans is evident from the beautiful mural of the servicemen on the wall of the lounge painted many years ago by Keith Weaver, to the POW/MIA table in the corner that reminds us of those who never returned, to the pictures of Past Commanders who guided us through the years, to the pavilion built to honor POW/MIA’s that continues to be a work in progress. As the motto under the mural says, “It’s not the price they paid to be a member, It’s the price they paid to be eligible.”